Exclusive Interview, Producer Suzanne Todd – Alice Through The Looking Glass #ThroughTheLookingGlassEvent

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While attending the Alice Through The Looking Glass Event in L.A., our group of bloggers had the chance to sit down and interview the movie’s producer, Suzanne Todd. It was a great conversation that included women in film, learning from the past, and there was even a surprise gift of shoes.

Suzanne Todd is an American film and television producer whose movies have grossed over two billion dollars worldwide. She is the owner of the film production company Team Todd and has produced hits for nearly every major studio.- IMBD

With such an impressive resume Suzanne is surprisingly down to earth, and a fantastic role model for young women. She seemed generally excited to connect with our group of bloggers. Not only in our interview setting but at the premiere and after-party as well. Meeting Suzanne was definitely a highlight of the event for this blogger.

As soon Suzanne walked into the room, there was some talk about Social Media Moms, and Suzanne’s special “Alice” shoes.
Q: Did you bring your Alice shoes?
ST Okay, so the collection for a regular choice for Alice sold out immediately in 10 minutes. There were lines on Regent Street in London five hours long. There are I think 12 different styles. This one that I got, I’ve only worn these twice. I brought them in the box so you could see how beautiful it looks, like the story book, right?

They only get better and better because even the little tissue paper has amazing Alice characters on it, inside amazing Alice fabric pattern. Little Alice underneath, and each of them has a different design on the bottom from the movie. And that same pattern of the little, two little girls. So there’s a red queen one that has like a red part that lights up.

Q : Are you wearing them tonight?
ST : I am not wearing them tonight, and I’ll tell you why. So there’s a flat that has a sandal that my daughter has that the one sandal is Alice and the other sandal is the White Rabbit, but on the bottom of that one, it has a little 3-D groove where if you walk, it leaves butterflies in waves. They’re really good. Okay. I’ll tell you why I’m not wearing them tonight, because, you guys are all really good, obviously. This internet Tweeting , Twittering, blogging, whatever, which I am not so much. You know, I spent 30 years making movies and I’m sort of new to all of this. I posted last week something about a really good friend, Maria Shriver turns 60 this year, and of course instead of asking for a birthday present, because she is a Shriver and, they have a life time of service, she said please just help me with my charity thing that’s coming up instead of buying me a birthday present. So I said I would help her with her fundraiser, which was this past weekend that was called Move for Minds. It was raising money for Alzheimer’s. She lost a parent to Alzheimer’s. And, I had posted, but I’ve never done this before, ’cause again I’m not like you guys way out there in the thing, and I posted, for people to support the fundraiser, which I just though oh, maybe someone will.

And all of my friends did, which was so nice. And there was one person that actually donated that I’ve never met, which I thought was so amazing, and she wrote that it was like in honor of her grandma, which was so touching, but I think she’s here.

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ST : It’s you! I’m giving you my special shoes. Thank you. I was really, really touched that you donated in honor of your grandma. We did the event on Saturday. We raised tons of money for Alzheimer’s research, and I learned so much about it actually. It was a great event. Thank you.

Q : So there’s a lot of great themes in this movie with family and Time and Alice being such a great heroine. What is, what are you most passionate about this movie?
ST: Well, obviously, from the beginning, and it’s been 10 years for me now making these two Alice movies, you know, this idea, my friend, the writer, Linda Woolverton, had come to me 10 years ago with that idea of making a movie where the girl could be the hero, be the heroine, was so exciting to me. And so, it was very, very difficult to craft the sequel. We had never intended to make a sequel. We didn’t rush to make a sequel like to just cash in on the financial success of the first one. We wanted to be really thoughtful about it. So I think that was always at the core of it, we were trying to be true to Alice’s story, trying to be true to the Lewis Carroll Alice and then, that addition, and I’m sure James talked about this as well, of really focusing on time, because obviously like I have a mother. I have three kids. You guys here are all working triple duty as moms do, and I just feel like the older I get, the more precious I find my time is to me. So that for us was really important. So really, those two things, the idea of being able to put a movie out there that is a kind of we girls can do anything movie, for my little girl who is 11 now, and also just recognizing, time is so precious to all of us.

And when I look at technology like we’re talking about this, the lovely positive power of the internet, there’s a thing about technology as that it was supposed to be created to give all of us more leisure time. Like remember, oh, the fax machine or oh, a blackberry, and now you’re gonna leave work early and have extra time to spend with your kids, but really what is does in some ways is it’s turned all of us into 24 hour workers, ’cause there’s no time of the day when you can’t be doing something productive that has to do with your technology. So, it’s a balance that we all have to try and find for when we’re gonna turn it off of put it away and really sit down on the blanket and have a picnic with our kids, ’cause it doesn’t happen enough, but then when it does, I think everybody has that moment where they think oh, this is what I should be doing on a Sunday afternoon, but I’m hoping people will watch the movie and really come out of it and have those conversation or, just be in that space a little bit more because the movie inspired them to, so that, that would make me really happy.

Q : So as a single mom, how are you making all this work? You set aside, I know, it’s crazy, especially right now, but do you set aside certain times where that’s it. I’m not answering my phone after 8 o’clock or this is Mommy and Me time, or…
ST: Well, yeah, for sure, two of mine are teenagers now, so as you know, that’s a big shift because I can’t have mine out if I tell them they can’t, can’t have theirs out. So, for sure, dinner time, there’s times when we have to just put it away. I have found over the years, I’ve been divorced like 6 or 7 years now. I have my kids 100 percent, so I found over the years that it’s important to have time for the three of them together with me, you know family time, but also to have individual time with them. And I think it came to that. I didn’t realize that in the beginning, how important it was to carve out time for each of them, because they’re all, different and unique in their one way. But yeah, my schedule is always crazy. I mean, I use Google calendar. Probably everybody does, you know. Everybody has a color and I always joke and say it’s like a war operation of like moving people around or, you know how it is. You make your plan, and on the day somebody gets sick or they forget their homework. She forgot her volleyball shoes and it all kind of goes, you know, that’s the same for everybody. It’s just a little bit of craziness.

Q: It sounds like a real mom, like the rest of us.
ST : Well, I have to say, and I said this in Florida(social media moms), I felt like when we were shooting in London, because as opposed to some other locations where I can fly back and forth if its close enough, London was so far that I just picked them up, kit and caboodle and they came with me for the whole time. But they are so spoiled. It was like a working mom will never have it so good because they were my prisoners, you know. We would wake up in the morning, and we would all go to Shepperton together. We would take the crew call in the morning, and they each had a classroom where they would go and do their school work from home with a tutor, then we would have lunch together, then they each had a department that was their favorite. So my oldest would go to the camera department, and my little girl would go to – he called it fashion, but we call it the costume department, and she would go and work with Colleen. And then by the time we wrapped, we would have dinner and watch dailies and go home, but they were like in my clutches. They weren’t like going off with their friends or going to their softball games, so, um, yeah, that was super fun for me, my prisoners.

Q: Was truly Through The Looking Glass easier or tougher than the first one?
ST: Well, in a way, I think maybe harder because the response to the first film was so kind of unexpected and overwhelming. So then there’s all this pressure that you don’t, you want to do something always with movies that will be commercially viable, because that’s why you get to make more movies, but you also want to do something that says something that’s important to you, you know. Like I said, also, you know, just for me with the three kids, the older I get, the less I want to ever do a movie that doesn’t feed my soul. You know, you don’t want to do those movies that you’re just kind of doing because you need to, if you don’t have to. We also built big sets on the second one, and getting the cast together was much harder on the second one because they’ve all continued to have flourishing, amazing careers, and have won an Oscar since then and they’ve done so many amazing things and Johnny’s always booked. He’s always working. On the first movie, the really interesting thing about the casting process, because it was Tim Burton, who’s Tim Burton. Normally when you’re casting a movie, you go through the script and you make lists of the characters, and then there’s about 20 actors on a list, and you go one my one and you offer it to them. You go to Brad Pitt and say Brad Pitt, do you want to do it? And he says no, and so then you go to George Clooney and say do you want to do it? And you kind of work your way through the process. On the first Alice, Tim literally just picked the people he wanted, and called them. And every single person said yes. There was one character where he picked somebody and she said yes, and then she had dates issues and so then, we had moved on to somebody else, but everybody wanted to do it ’cause they just wanted to obviously like work with Tim and they loved the script. So the second time, obviously, we knew who most of the actors were going to be, but scheduling was very difficult. It probably took us almost another year to really get started, to get all the actors when they could work at the same time. And even then, you talk about the scheduling with the three kids, imagine with the actors because it wasn’t like we have all the actors for the three months we need them, you know. We have Johnny for these days here and we have Anthony’s days here. We have Sasha for these days, when he’s finishing the other movie. And it’s all like a very complicated jigsaw puzzle.

Q : You mentioned that you never thought about the sequel when you were making the first movie. When was the day or moment when you said okay, we’re gonna do a sequel.
ST So we all took a moment to kind of breath and, relax after finishing the difficult movie the first time. And then I really went back and Linda went back and we just went back into the literature, and read the books and re-read the books again and re-read the poems. And we actually read a couple other books just on feminism and raising girls and the specific art of the emotional life of girls. And then it kind of started to gel for Linda, that she had an idea. And once it came together into this idea, she wanted to go back and see the characters when they were younger and what that trajectory was for Alice and look at these different themes we talked about before, then it became clear that it was something we really wanted to do.

Q: Do you have a special message for single moms who are in pursuit of a career that they love, like yours?
ST: A message for moms, I guess really I’m learning every day just like the rest of you. I think however many years it is down the road for me now, I definitely, I know it sounds like an Instagram saying, but I definitely sweat the small stuff less and I feel like in my old life, I definitely sweated it more. And maybe that’s just because I don’t have time for it, or the energy for it, but, situations, people, things that bring drama and conflict and aren’t productive moving forward things, I really stay away from or avoid or I will cross the street to get away from. And that’s very different for me, I think, than I was probably 10 years ago or 15 years ago. I’m very, very focused on what I think will be a positive outcome, and it’s something I actually talk about a lot with my kids and stuff that comes up for them, because I always think the best advice I can ever give myself is the advice I tell my kids, because I’m much better at telling my kids what to do usually than I am at telling myself. So if I pause and think about what I would tell them, then I usually do a better job, but that idea of trying to avoid the stuff that actually isn’t helping you get where you need to go, including sometimes your own thought process about it like having negative thoughts inside or telling yourself that something is harder than it really is, because it’s not really helping you. So you can just kind of let that go, like my kids and I say we just kind of like floated away, because I’m also, I’m a big meditator. I have been for 20 years and I taught it to my kids now. And when people always ask me how I get so much done in a busy day, I think that’s a big part of it, which makes no sense to people, because they’re like what do you mean? You take 20 minutes off twice a day to meditate, but for me it really helps me focus and stay on track and gives me a lot of good things that help me get other things done. I would say focusing on what you really need and just being brutal about it, you know. Also, a little bit of learning to say no. I’m definitely a little bit less of a yes to everything and people pleaser than I was probably when my kids were younger. And, I think it’s a good thing.

Q : You produce a variety of different movies. Like Alice Through The Looking Glass to something like Bad Moms. So, I feel if you looked in my diary. How do you approach something like that? They’re so different.
ST : Bad Moms, when you see it, you’ll see that there’s no similarities in making the R-rated movie and the Disney movie. But what you’ll see is what all of you guys feel and why, you know, you guys are popular in the stuff that you write about, because there’s a reliability to actual experience that I hope people will see in Alice. In Alice, we’re looking at a girl in her 20’s, and so that’s been a long time ago for me, but I remember that idea of trying to kind of balance career and balance a relationship or a romantic relationship. You’re kind of redefining what’s going on with your parents and all of that we struggle with in our 20’s. And in Bad Moms, obviously, those girls are a little bit older, but again it’s a relatable look at what it’s really like, how hard it is. And the thing that is so satisfying to me whenever I talk about Bad Moms is, the thing I loved about taking it on is I feel like we’re all so hard on ourselves, myself included, like we’re all so hard on ourselves on a daily basis as moms, because we feel like we could have done more. We could have done better or that girl packed a better lunch or her kids speak Mandarin or all those things. So in our script there’s Christina Applegate, who’s the mean one in school who tortures Mila Kunis, but, when I talk about the movie or even with those six actresses, every single person had a Gwendolyn in her life, whether it was at her schools or her sister-in-law or her mother-in-law. There’s somebody that’s like putting energy everyday into making you feel bad. And that idea that hopefully you’ll come out of the movie and feel like I don’t really need to feel bad, you know. Because what she says doesn’t really mean anything to me, you know, any more than like they guy standing next to me at Starbucks. I can just feel good about what I’m trying to do and enjoy my life with my kids rather than just trying to be this unobtainable, perfect mom. So, I don’t know, I guess maybe relatability is the theme or what attracts me to those projects that are very dissimilar.

Q: Earlier on, you mentioned feminism. In the movie there was a section where he said the sea captain is not a job for a girl. Have you ever had to deal with that in your life?
ST:Do you mean yet today, because for sure it happened yesterday. Like everyday?
ST : Okay, it’s just part of working in Hollywood, you know. Unfortunately it’s just, you look at these dismal numbers of female directors and female producers. And I’ve been doing it literally 30 years now, and it hasn’t really changed very much, I wish that it had changed more. I mean, it’s certainly taken smalls forward, but it’s not like it’s hugely different. It is very difficult. I’d like to lie and say oh, no, that’s not true at all, but that’s true. It’s harder as a woman.

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Q : Do you work with other females in the industry to help mentor them and,help them succeed?
ST : I do, I always have a mentee. I went to film school at USC, so I always had a mentee every year from there, a girl, and then I always have a mentee every year from the producer’s guild, which is another group that I’m affiliated with. And then I was on the board of a girl’s school here called the Archer School for girls for six years. And so I work with those girls also. They just actually had a film festival, and I got to go and speak on a panel for them. And I love spending time around, obviously like young people, because they have so much more energy than I do, you know. Like I’m old and tired, and you spend time around your mentee a young person and you get so much inspiration from them. I do really appreciate that, that mentor thing. I always tell them I can just tell them mistakes that I made more so than wisdom that I can pass along, but sometimes you can learn for other people’s mistakes.

Q:That’s what that theme is in the movie, too. You can learn from the past.
ST : Yes, well, you really have no choice, right, because you can’t go back. Looking backward is, you know, in some ways, just a waste of time.

Q : With Johnny Depp and with Sasha Baron Cohen. I’m sure those two together were interesting to work with for this type of movie.
ST: For sure, I mean, Sasha, when we’d started with him, I thought one of the funniest things was Sasha talked about how when he’s developing his character, that the costume is really, really important for him. And when we got into it with Colleen, our genius talented Colleen Atwood, Sasha played so many interesting characters before that there was certain things he wanted to stay away from. Like he didn’t want to do anything he had done before, so then it was kind of this process of elimination, but the one thing he really, really wanted to do was wear tights. Which I thought was so funny, and I didn’t totally understand it, but I went to the first costume fitting and I saw him in the tights. And it was like, of course, because his legs are ridiculous. And I was like,, he has like two spider legs where literally his thigh is the same size as his angle, which if you look closely in the movie, you’ll see, but I love that Sasha understood the ridiculousness, the skinniness of his legs, and that’s why he wanted those little pantaloons with the tights. Then under that big hat, he has, we call it a man bun. And then at one point, we had discovered this really funny Instagram feed that’s called Man Buns of Disneyland. So its only pictures of dudes with man buns at Disneyland. And we were joking leading up to the movie that we kept saying we wanted to get some like Sasha pictures put together like he was at Disneyland, so that Time could be in Man Buns of Disneyland, because we love that feed. So many entertaining feeds. With Johnny, obviously we weren’t like inventing a new character, but it was so, so amazing. It wasn’t something I was thinking about the first day that Johnny was working and he came and gone through the makeup and the wig and the contacts and everything. And we were doing a scene and I just remember the first time he opened his mouth and spoke, I got tears in my eyes, because it was like seeing the Hatter again. It had been so many years in between, and Johnny, as you guys saw in the movie, is so gifted and just bringing vulnerability to the Hatter, even behind all of the craziness. It’s, like he’s such a talented actor and it was just so sweet. I was like seeing an old friend that I hadn’t seen for so long, and in a different way when Helena was doing the Red Queen and yelling and all that over again. It was funny the first time my kids met Sasha, because of course they had never seen Borat or Ali G or any of that, it was very funny because my daughter said oh, yeah, I know you. You’re King Julian from Madagascar. Sasha was like, well, I really love that’s what you think I’m famous for, or something like that. And then she has a very funny impression of King Julian what of course she wanted to do for Sasha, um, which she did and he was very kind about it. It involved spitting, though. There’s like a spitting part of what King Julian does, but, ah, yeah, that’s fun with your kids on set, for sure.

Q : Alice, ah, has so many wonderful scenes, but do you have one that you like the most or is more special to you?
ST: There’s sort of a running joke from the two movies, because I work sometimes with my younger sister who happens to have red hair, you know, this sort of Red Queen, White Queen sort of joke, not that the White Queen is the good one and Red Queen is the bad one. Although you may have thought that in the first movie, certainly in the second movie, you get to see it, but I mean, I, I love all the scenes. There is something about that sister story line, because I have two sisters, that’s very special for me. And also, you know, when you look at the young White Queen, the idea that, you know, she’s not, she’s not a bad person. I think all of us, you know, my kids for sure have behaved that way. I behaved that way when I was a kid. You know, when you just make a mistake, she just did the wrong thing and in the moment, you feel like you’re on the spot and she said the wrong thing. And then when you see in the movie the trajectory of everything that happened because of that I love that scene at the end where they have a little tiny bit of reconciliation, although we’ll see how long that lasts, if we make another movie.

Disney’s “Alice Through the Looking Glass” is playing in theaters everywhere NOW!

In Disney’s “Alice Through the Looking Glass,” an all-new spectacular adventure featuring the unforgettable characters from Lewis Carroll’s beloved stories, Alice returns to the whimsical world of Underland and travels back in time to save the Mad Hatter.

Facebook: Facebook.com/DisneyAlice
Twitter: https://twitter.com/disneystudios
Instagram:https://instagram.com/DisneyAlice

Watch for more Alice Through The Looking Glass posts to be published here soon, including interviews and a movie review.

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FTC Disclaimer: I attended an expense paid trip by Disney to press events for Alice Through The Looking Glass. All opinions shared are always honest and my own. Interview photos by Photo Credit Jana Seitzer from Merlot Mommy.

Comments

  1. Robin Masshole Mommy says:

    My friend is super excited for this movie. She’s been waiting for a long time for it to come out.

  2. I can’t even begin to express how excited I am to see this movie! I am a huge fan of Alice in Wonderland. I am like a kid going to see a movie for the very first time. It’s sad…but true! =)

    Seems like this was a fun event. I am loving the shoes she showed you all. =)

  3. It must have been a blast being able to interview the producer. I can’t wait to go see this movie in the theaters. Alice in Wonderland has always been a favorite of mine.

  4. Producer Suzanne Todd is such a cutie pie. I freaking love those shoes, I would put them on a display shelf in my office. Like way cool! No wonder they sold out.

    The behind the scenes talk about the movies is always so cool.

  5. Suzanne Todd sounds like an amazing woman. She really is an inspiration. Those shoes are gorgeous!

  6. Sounds like she put in a lot of thought with this movie. Those shoes are awesome! She sounds like a very accomplished woman, we can all use as an example to help us to do we want to do too. I cannot wait for the movie to come out.

  7. Went to see it about 2 weeks ago and LOVED it. There is so much to learn from this movie and tbh I prefer it a lot more than the first, although there are some parts of it that I didn’t think would be suitable for very young kids.

  8. Such an interesting interview! I was already excited to see this movie (loved the first one), but now I want to see it even more!

  9. What a fantastic interview, I just went to see this movie over the weekend and what a FANTASTIC movie it is!

  10. Glad you shared this interview with us, love how in depth it is! This movie looks like it is going to be fantastic!

  11. It sounds like she put a lot of hard work into this project. It will be great seeing the movie! I love Lewis Carroll’s stories.

  12. This is such a great interview! I can’t even being to imagine all of the work her and the crew put into this movie. I can’t wait to go and see it.

  13. Kita says:

    Excellent interview and I really love those shoes. I am excited to see this movie and kudos to her for rocking it. I know the movie will do great.

  14. CourtneyLynne says:

    Omg this must of been one incredible event to attend. Hubby and I just saw the movie over the weekend and loved it!

  15. Bri says:

    My family is so excited to see this movie. The entire interview was great and I really like how all of the questions were well-rounded.

  16. Rebecca Swenor says:

    This sounds like it was an amazing interview as well as event. Suzanne Todd sounds like an awesome woman as producer who has worked hard to get where she is today. We can wait to see this movie. Thanks for sharing a this awesome interview.

  17. Bonnie @wemake7 says:

    What a cool interview. My oldest daughter just went and saw this movie the other night.

  18. You are so lucky to meet her. I am so excited for this movie! The cast list alone is incredible.

  19. I kept meaning to see the first one, but never did! I really need to catch up so I can go see this one!